Cross-Sectoral

2016

Community Wealth Building Form: What they are and how to use them at the local level

Steve Dubb
Academy of Management Perspectives

In this article for the Academy of Management PerspectivesSteve Dubb, Director of Special Projects at the Democracy Collaborative, writes a comprehensive review on community wealth building strategies, progress, and implementation in local communities:

2015

Equity: The Soul of Collective Impact

Michael McAfee, Angela Glover Blackwell and Judith Bell

The long, rich history of community-building work in low-income communities and communities of color provides a foundation of theory and practice on which today’s collective impact framework must build to achieve results commensurate with society’s biggest challenges. That foundation is equity—just and fair inclusion into a society in which all can participate, prosper, and reach their full potential. Equity, both racial and economic, must be infused through all aspects of collective impact processes,from the deep engagement of communities to the collection and analysis of data; the design and scale of solutions; and the capacities, point of view, and roles of backbone organizations. 

Creating a Just and Inclusive America

Xavier Briggs
George Warren Brown School of Social Work

Adapted from an address given at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, January 22, 2015, in celebration of the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Center for Social Development. 

2014

Defining Quality Collective Impact

Jeff Edmondson and Ben Hecht
Supplement to SSIR sponsored by The Collective Impact Forum

2013

The Possibility of a Pluralist Commonwealth and a Community Sustaining Economy

Gar Alperovitz and Steve Dubb
The Good Society

This essay by Democracy Collaborative co-founder Gar Alperovitz and Research Director Steve Dubb opens the academic symposium journal issue on “Alternatives to Capitalism” which provides a collection of essays that explore the broader implications of community wealth building for creating a new economy.

Returns to Capital: Austerity and the Crisis of European Social Democracy

Joe Guinan
The Good Society

Time for the European left to return to its roots and rediscover the alternative models that are a nearly-forgotten part of its heritage.

Challenging Corporate Domination: The Public Ownership Approach

Thomas Hanna
The Good Society

In the wake of the most crippling economic downturn since the Great Depression, it is becoming increasingly evident that the United States is facing a myriad of serious problems that can no longer be solved by a stalemated political system.1 These challenges will inevitably require the conceptualization of a vision for comprehensive systemic change, and a major component of this is the question of what to do about the large private corporations that presently, to varying degrees, imperil our economy, threaten our democracy, and impede progress on environmental issues. 

2012

2011

2010

2009

Building Healthy Communities Through Equitable Food Access

Judith Bell and Marion Standish
Community Development Investment Review, volume 5, issue 3

Not Just for Profit

Marjorie Kelly
strategy+business, issue 54

2008

Rural Economic Development in a Diverse and Rapidly Changing Land

Andrea Glickman and Trish Kelly
Submitted to the National Rural Funders Collaborative: Closing the Gap Conference

2007

Asset Building Comes of Age

Gar Alperovitz, Steve Dubb and Ted Howard
Shelterforce

In the Spring 2007 issue of the National Housing Institute's journal Shelterforce, C-W.org' s own Gar Alperovitz, Steve Dubb, and Ted Howard examine growing efforts nationwide to integrate individual and community wealth building.

2006

2005

Community Building in Hawai’i

Bob Agres
The Nonprofit Quarterly, volume 12, number 2

2003

Cross-Sectoral Economic-Related Institutional Innovation

Gar Alperovitz
Opening address to the Forum on Intersectoral Relations sponsored by The Aspen Institute Nonprofit Sector Research Fund

1999

207

2014

What Counts: Harnessing Data for America’s Communities

Naomi Cytron et al., eds.

What Counts, a joint publication from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and the Urban Institute, offers a series of essays on how practitioners, policymakers, and funders can collect and analyze data to better inform community development strategies. The authors, with backgrounds in public health, education, finance, law, community development, and information systems, highlight the necessity of data sharing across sectors to foster collaboration. 

2013

All-In Nation: An America That Works for All

This new book from PolicyLink and the Center for American Progress offers policy recommendations for building a prosperous economy by ensuring that all are able to participate and achieve their full potential – particularly communities of color that are quickly becoming the nation’s majority. As the nation undergoes profound demographic shifts, equity has increasingly become an economic imperative. Comprising essays and policy solutions from leading thinkers and trailblazing activists across multiple policy arenas, this collection explores issues from education and workforce development to democratic participation. The book aims to advance the national conversation beyond focus on what’s wrong to looking for what works.

2012

2005

2004

2003

Making a Place for Community: Local Democracy in a Global Era

Thad Williamson, David Imbroscio and Gar Alperovitz

Making a Place for Community argues that misguided politics at the local, state and national level have damaged local community life in the United State and weaken the basis of local democracy. Through a combination of community wealth building strategies, from land trusts to municipal and employee ownership, Thad Williamson, David Imbroscio, and Gar Alperovitz show how people can act to limit sprawl and build economic stability by anchoring jobs in local communites.

2000

1998

2016

Wealth Inequalities in Greater Boston: Do Race and Ethnicity Matter?

Tatjana Meschede, Darrick Hamilton, Ana Patricia Muñoz, Regine Jackson and William Darity Jr.
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

The Potential for Summer Youth Employment Programs to Reduce Inequality: What Do We Know?

Alicia Sasser Modestino and Trinh Nguyen
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Summer Youth Employment Programs (SYEP) are believed to improve the economic, academic, and behavioral outcomes of the population they serve, particularly for inner-city, low-income, and non-white youth. As part of a larger evaluation, we collected survey data on participants in the Boston 2015 SYEP. These participants reported additional job readiness skills, higher academic aspirations, and more positive attitudes towards their communities compared to the control group. Overall, these trends are encouraging, particularly because the largest gains were observed for minority youth. It remains unclear whether these short-term improvements will result in sustained advantages down the road. In the second phase of our evaluation, we hope to tackle this question by linking the survey responses reported in this brief to administrative data from employment, academic, and behavioral records, to better articulate the long-term effects of SYEP. 

Internal Culture, External Impact: How a Change-Making Culture Positions Foundations to Achieve Transformational Change

Amy Celep, Sara Brenner and Rachel Mosher-Williams

This article argues that a foundation’s internal culture is critical to achieving large-scale social change, but that efforts to build a change-making culture too often are left out of strategy conversations. 

While there is no one culture that suits every foundation, a particular set of characteristics must be present in those that seek large-scale social change: a focus on outcomes, transparency, authenticity, collaboration, racial equity and inclusion, continuous learning, and openness to risk. This article offers insights into why culture can be challenging for foundations to address and maintain, examines cases of successful culture change at foundations, and offers advice for foundations that aspire to it. 

2015

The Church of Economism and Its Discontents

Richard Norgaard

Two centuries of explosive economic growth have radically altered our material and ideological worlds. With human activity now the major driver of geological change, the industrial era has come to be called the Anthropocene. This inquiry instead adopts the term Econocene, underscoring its ideological foundation: economism. The concept of economism, the reduction of all social relations to market logic, often appears in critiques of political movements and neoliberal economics. Our concern here is with economism as a widely held system of faith. This modern “religion” is essential for the maintenance of the global market economy, for justifying personal decisions, and for explaining and rationalizing the cosmos we have created. This uncritical economic creed has colonized other disciplines, including ecology, as ecologists increasingly rely on economistic logic to rationalize the protection of ecosystems. More broadly, economism often works syncretically with the world’s religions even though it violates so many of their basic tenets. A Great Transition is needed to replace economism with an equally powerful and pervasive belief system that embraces the values of solidarity, sustainability, and well-being for all. 

Public Sector Jobs: Opportunities for Advancing Racial Equity

Julie Nelson and Syreeta Tyrell

Years of organizing within the Civil Rights Movement led to the eventual passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, with Title VII containing prohibitions of discrimination in the workplace on the basis of race and other protected classes. This accomplishment provided tools for the enforcement of illegal discrimination laws and has reduced many explicitly discriminatory behaviors over the past half a century. However, racial inequities continue to persist across all indicators for success in the United Sates. For local and regional government focused on achieving racial equity in our communities, “walking the talk” within one’s own institution and workforce is an important place to focus. 

Less Debt, More Equity: Lowering Student Debt While Closing the Black-White Wealth Gap

Laura Sullivan, Tatjana Meschede, Lars Dietrich and Thomas Shapiro

 This analysis uses the Racial Wealth Audit, a framework developed by the Institute on Assets and Social Policy (IASP) to assess the impact of public policy on the wealth gap between white and Black households. We use the framework to model the impact of various student debt relief policies to identify the approaches most likely to reduce inequities in wealth by race, as opposed to exacerbating existing inequities. We focus specifically on the Black- white wealth gap both because of the historic roots of inequality described above, and because student debt (in the form of borrowing rates and levels) seems to be contributing to wealth disparities between Black and white young adults, in particular. 

2014

The Making of Ferguson: Public Policies at the Root of its Troubles

Richard Rothstein

This paper from the Economic Policy Institute encourages a critical examination of the role of structural racism, as embedded in policy, that has fostered extreme inequality in the St. Louis metropolitan area—made apparent after the shooting of Michael Brown. Author Richard Rothstein, Research Associate at the Economic Policy Institute and senior fellow of the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, finds that the institutionalization of racially prejudiced real estate, banking, insurance, and land use policies at the federal, state, and local level, fostered and continue to promulgate racially segregated neighborhoods with high poverty, unemployment, and oppressive policing.

2013

2012

Community Organizing As Job Creator: An Investment That Works For All

Karen Kelsey, et al

Gamaliel’s latest study, Community Organizing As Job Creator, argues that more investment in community organizing leads to multiple economic benefits including job creation and community stabilization. Examining the achievements of the Gamaliel network over the last five years, the study finds that the network directed over $16.6 billion toward infrastructure development, education and transit that created and saved a total of nearly 640,000 jobs. The report is intended not just for community organizers, but also elected officials, businesspeople, government agencies, and any advocate for the common good.

2011

2010

Not-Just-For-Profit: Alternative Business Models, version 3

Jennifer Abel, Sarah Fleming, Jackie Jackson, Raphael McGinnis, Aaron Shafer and Suresh Susarla

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

Small Cities Blues: Looking for Growth Factors in Small and Medium-Sized Cities

George A. Erickcek and Hannah J. McKinney

The purpose of this exploratory study is to attempt to identify particular public policies which have the potential to increase the economic viability of smaller metropolitan areas and cities. We identify characteristics associated with smaller metro areas that performed better-than-expected (winners) and worse-than-expected (losers) during the 1990s, given their resources, industrial mix, and location as of 1990. Once these characteristics have been identified, we look for evidence that public policy choices may have promoted and enhanced a metro area’s ability to succeed and to regain control of its own economic destiny. Methodologically, we construct a regression model which identifies the small metro areas that achieved higher-than-expected economic prosperity (winners) and the areas that saw lower-than-expected economic prosperity (losers) according to the model. Next, we explore whether indications exist that winners and losers are qualitatively different from other areas in ways that may indicate consequences of policy choices. A cluster analysis is completed to group the metro areas based on changes in a host of social, economic, and demographic variables between 1990 and 2000. We then use contingency table analysis and ANOVA to see if “winning” or “losing,” as measured by the error term from the regression, is related to the grouping of metro areas in a way that may indicate the presence of deliberate and replicable government policy. 

2003

2002

2001

n/a

Making Public Participation Legal

Working Group on Legal Frameworks for Public Participation

2016

2015

Making the Case for Linking Community Development and Health

Edmonds et al

This report, published in partnership by the Center on Social Disparities in Health, the Build Healthy Places Network, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is a "resource for those working to improve low-income communities and the lives of the people living in them." Despite growing recognition that social and economic conditions are the primary drivers of health, the fields of community development and public health remain siloed. This new report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Build Healthy Places Network outlines specific opportunities to integrate the two fields and overcome barriers to collaboration. It also includes recommendations on how to measure the impact of cross-sector collaborations and refine programs accordingly.  

2014

2013

Regenerating America's Legacy Cities

Alan Mallach and Lavea Brachman

This Lincoln Institute of Land Policy study, entitled Regenerating America’s Legacy Cities, examines new strategies for rebuilding and reinventing the economies of older industrial cities that have experienced dramatic job and population decreases over the last few decades. Authors Alan Mallach and Lavea Brachman detail how these “legacy cities” can employ land-use planning tools that reflect the changing economy and social fabric to support new forms of economic development.

State of the Dream 2013: A Long Way From Home: Housing Asset Policy and the Racial Wealth Divide

Tim Sullivan, Maz Ali, Carlos Perez de Alejo, Brian Miller and Nicole Marin Baena

To mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, United for a Fair Economy outlines how a national history of racially discriminatory policies and practices created the racial wealth divide that exists today. Worse, present policy perpetuates these patterns. This report offers recommendations for housing, ownership, and wealth creation policies that aim to reduce this divide by designing asset building policies that reach those most in need and not just home-buyers and encouraging alternative ownership models that build community, and not just individual, wealth.  Included are several case studies that highlight action at the local, state, and regional levels to address racial inequality. 

2012

2011

2010

2009

Keeping Wealth Local: Shared Ownership and Wealth Control For Rural Communities

Marjorie Kelly and Shanna Ratner

Resources do not represent community wealth unless communities own and control them. This handbook looks at various kinds of shared ownership, including cooperatives, employee ownership, community land trusts, municipal ownership, local and tribal ownership, mission-controlled ownership, and community covenants and easements. Each section looks at strengths, weaknesses, the range of applications, expertise required, and sources of assistance.

2008

2007

Why Some Rural Communities Prosper While Others Do Not

Andrew M. Isserman, Edward Feser and Drake Warren
report prepared for the Office of the Under Secretary for Rural Development, U.S. Department of Agriculture, under Cooperative Agreement AG RBCSRBS-02-12

Regionalism: Growing Together To Expand Opportunity To All

Glenn Johnson, Angel Torres, Samir Gambhir, Mary McGirl, Julie Nielsen, Jason Reece, Rebecca Reno, Denis Rhoden Jr., Christy Rogers, Angela Stanley and Arnold Chandler
Submitted to the Presidents’ Council of Cleveland

2006

The Commons Rising

David Bollier, Jonathan Rowe and edited by Peter Barnes and Seth Zuckerman

When you hear the phrase “the commons,” you might think of a medieval town where peasants graze sheep, but the commons of the 21st century is much more hi-tech. From wi-fi to broadcast spectrum to the Internet, a new commons is rising.

2005

Enterprising Organizations: New Asset-Based and Other Innovative Approaches to Solving Social and Economic Problems: Highlights from a forum on Social Enterprise

Alan Abramson, editor

In May 2005, The Aspen Institute, in collaboration with the Democracy Collaborative, convened practitioners, investors, foundation donors, elected officials, scholars, and reporters to generate ideas on how to advance community wealth building efforts. This report provides highlights from the discussion that ensued.

2004

2002

2001

n/a

Community Wealth Building Form: What they are and how to use them at the local level

Steve Dubb
Academy of Management Perspectives

In this article for the Academy of Management PerspectivesSteve Dubb, Director of Special Projects at the Democracy Collaborative, writes a comprehensive review on community wealth building strategies, progress, and implementation in local communities:

Equity: The Soul of Collective Impact

Michael McAfee, Angela Glover Blackwell and Judith Bell

The long, rich history of community-building work in low-income communities and communities of color provides a foundation of theory and practice on which today’s collective impact framework must build to achieve results commensurate with society’s biggest challenges. That foundation is equity—just and fair inclusion into a society in which all can participate, prosper, and reach their full potential. Equity, both racial and economic, must be infused through all aspects of collective impact processes,from the deep engagement of communities to the collection and analysis of data; the design and scale of solutions; and the capacities, point of view, and roles of backbone organizations. 

Creating a Just and Inclusive America

Xavier Briggs
George Warren Brown School of Social Work

Adapted from an address given at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, January 22, 2015, in celebration of the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Center for Social Development. 

Defining Quality Collective Impact

Jeff Edmondson and Ben Hecht
Supplement to SSIR sponsored by The Collective Impact Forum

The Possibility of a Pluralist Commonwealth and a Community Sustaining Economy

Gar Alperovitz and Steve Dubb
The Good Society

This essay by Democracy Collaborative co-founder Gar Alperovitz and Research Director Steve Dubb opens the academic symposium journal issue on “Alternatives to Capitalism” which provides a collection of essays that explore the broader implications of community wealth building for creating a new economy.

Returns to Capital: Austerity and the Crisis of European Social Democracy

Joe Guinan
The Good Society

Time for the European left to return to its roots and rediscover the alternative models that are a nearly-forgotten part of its heritage.

Challenging Corporate Domination: The Public Ownership Approach

Thomas Hanna
The Good Society

In the wake of the most crippling economic downturn since the Great Depression, it is becoming increasingly evident that the United States is facing a myriad of serious problems that can no longer be solved by a stalemated political system.1 These challenges will inevitably require the conceptualization of a vision for comprehensive systemic change, and a major component of this is the question of what to do about the large private corporations that presently, to varying degrees, imperil our economy, threaten our democracy, and impede progress on environmental issues. 

Building Healthy Communities Through Equitable Food Access

Judith Bell and Marion Standish
Community Development Investment Review, volume 5, issue 3

Not Just for Profit

Marjorie Kelly
strategy+business, issue 54

Rural Economic Development in a Diverse and Rapidly Changing Land

Andrea Glickman and Trish Kelly
Submitted to the National Rural Funders Collaborative: Closing the Gap Conference

Asset Building Comes of Age

Gar Alperovitz, Steve Dubb and Ted Howard
Shelterforce

In the Spring 2007 issue of the National Housing Institute's journal Shelterforce, C-W.org' s own Gar Alperovitz, Steve Dubb, and Ted Howard examine growing efforts nationwide to integrate individual and community wealth building.

Community Building in Hawai’i

Bob Agres
The Nonprofit Quarterly, volume 12, number 2

Cross-Sectoral Economic-Related Institutional Innovation

Gar Alperovitz
Opening address to the Forum on Intersectoral Relations sponsored by The Aspen Institute Nonprofit Sector Research Fund

What Counts: Harnessing Data for America’s Communities

Naomi Cytron et al., eds.

What Counts, a joint publication from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and the Urban Institute, offers a series of essays on how practitioners, policymakers, and funders can collect and analyze data to better inform community development strategies. The authors, with backgrounds in public health, education, finance, law, community development, and information systems, highlight the necessity of data sharing across sectors to foster collaboration. 

All-In Nation: An America That Works for All

This new book from PolicyLink and the Center for American Progress offers policy recommendations for building a prosperous economy by ensuring that all are able to participate and achieve their full potential – particularly communities of color that are quickly becoming the nation’s majority. As the nation undergoes profound demographic shifts, equity has increasingly become an economic imperative. Comprising essays and policy solutions from leading thinkers and trailblazing activists across multiple policy arenas, this collection explores issues from education and workforce development to democratic participation. The book aims to advance the national conversation beyond focus on what’s wrong to looking for what works.

Making a Place for Community: Local Democracy in a Global Era

Thad Williamson, David Imbroscio and Gar Alperovitz

Making a Place for Community argues that misguided politics at the local, state and national level have damaged local community life in the United State and weaken the basis of local democracy. Through a combination of community wealth building strategies, from land trusts to municipal and employee ownership, Thad Williamson, David Imbroscio, and Gar Alperovitz show how people can act to limit sprawl and build economic stability by anchoring jobs in local communites.

Wealth Inequalities in Greater Boston: Do Race and Ethnicity Matter?

Tatjana Meschede, Darrick Hamilton, Ana Patricia Muñoz, Regine Jackson and William Darity Jr.
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

The Potential for Summer Youth Employment Programs to Reduce Inequality: What Do We Know?

Alicia Sasser Modestino and Trinh Nguyen
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Summer Youth Employment Programs (SYEP) are believed to improve the economic, academic, and behavioral outcomes of the population they serve, particularly for inner-city, low-income, and non-white youth. As part of a larger evaluation, we collected survey data on participants in the Boston 2015 SYEP. These participants reported additional job readiness skills, higher academic aspirations, and more positive attitudes towards their communities compared to the control group. Overall, these trends are encouraging, particularly because the largest gains were observed for minority youth. It remains unclear whether these short-term improvements will result in sustained advantages down the road. In the second phase of our evaluation, we hope to tackle this question by linking the survey responses reported in this brief to administrative data from employment, academic, and behavioral records, to better articulate the long-term effects of SYEP. 

Internal Culture, External Impact: How a Change-Making Culture Positions Foundations to Achieve Transformational Change

Amy Celep, Sara Brenner and Rachel Mosher-Williams

This article argues that a foundation’s internal culture is critical to achieving large-scale social change, but that efforts to build a change-making culture too often are left out of strategy conversations. 

While there is no one culture that suits every foundation, a particular set of characteristics must be present in those that seek large-scale social change: a focus on outcomes, transparency, authenticity, collaboration, racial equity and inclusion, continuous learning, and openness to risk. This article offers insights into why culture can be challenging for foundations to address and maintain, examines cases of successful culture change at foundations, and offers advice for foundations that aspire to it. 

The Church of Economism and Its Discontents

Richard Norgaard

Two centuries of explosive economic growth have radically altered our material and ideological worlds. With human activity now the major driver of geological change, the industrial era has come to be called the Anthropocene. This inquiry instead adopts the term Econocene, underscoring its ideological foundation: economism. The concept of economism, the reduction of all social relations to market logic, often appears in critiques of political movements and neoliberal economics. Our concern here is with economism as a widely held system of faith. This modern “religion” is essential for the maintenance of the global market economy, for justifying personal decisions, and for explaining and rationalizing the cosmos we have created. This uncritical economic creed has colonized other disciplines, including ecology, as ecologists increasingly rely on economistic logic to rationalize the protection of ecosystems. More broadly, economism often works syncretically with the world’s religions even though it violates so many of their basic tenets. A Great Transition is needed to replace economism with an equally powerful and pervasive belief system that embraces the values of solidarity, sustainability, and well-being for all. 

Public Sector Jobs: Opportunities for Advancing Racial Equity

Julie Nelson and Syreeta Tyrell

Years of organizing within the Civil Rights Movement led to the eventual passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, with Title VII containing prohibitions of discrimination in the workplace on the basis of race and other protected classes. This accomplishment provided tools for the enforcement of illegal discrimination laws and has reduced many explicitly discriminatory behaviors over the past half a century. However, racial inequities continue to persist across all indicators for success in the United Sates. For local and regional government focused on achieving racial equity in our communities, “walking the talk” within one’s own institution and workforce is an important place to focus. 

Less Debt, More Equity: Lowering Student Debt While Closing the Black-White Wealth Gap

Laura Sullivan, Tatjana Meschede, Lars Dietrich and Thomas Shapiro

 This analysis uses the Racial Wealth Audit, a framework developed by the Institute on Assets and Social Policy (IASP) to assess the impact of public policy on the wealth gap between white and Black households. We use the framework to model the impact of various student debt relief policies to identify the approaches most likely to reduce inequities in wealth by race, as opposed to exacerbating existing inequities. We focus specifically on the Black- white wealth gap both because of the historic roots of inequality described above, and because student debt (in the form of borrowing rates and levels) seems to be contributing to wealth disparities between Black and white young adults, in particular. 

The Making of Ferguson: Public Policies at the Root of its Troubles

Richard Rothstein

This paper from the Economic Policy Institute encourages a critical examination of the role of structural racism, as embedded in policy, that has fostered extreme inequality in the St. Louis metropolitan area—made apparent after the shooting of Michael Brown. Author Richard Rothstein, Research Associate at the Economic Policy Institute and senior fellow of the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, finds that the institutionalization of racially prejudiced real estate, banking, insurance, and land use policies at the federal, state, and local level, fostered and continue to promulgate racially segregated neighborhoods with high poverty, unemployment, and oppressive policing.

Community Organizing As Job Creator: An Investment That Works For All

Karen Kelsey, et al

Gamaliel’s latest study, Community Organizing As Job Creator, argues that more investment in community organizing leads to multiple economic benefits including job creation and community stabilization. Examining the achievements of the Gamaliel network over the last five years, the study finds that the network directed over $16.6 billion toward infrastructure development, education and transit that created and saved a total of nearly 640,000 jobs. The report is intended not just for community organizers, but also elected officials, businesspeople, government agencies, and any advocate for the common good.

Not-Just-For-Profit: Alternative Business Models, version 3

Jennifer Abel, Sarah Fleming, Jackie Jackson, Raphael McGinnis, Aaron Shafer and Suresh Susarla

Small Cities Blues: Looking for Growth Factors in Small and Medium-Sized Cities

George A. Erickcek and Hannah J. McKinney

The purpose of this exploratory study is to attempt to identify particular public policies which have the potential to increase the economic viability of smaller metropolitan areas and cities. We identify characteristics associated with smaller metro areas that performed better-than-expected (winners) and worse-than-expected (losers) during the 1990s, given their resources, industrial mix, and location as of 1990. Once these characteristics have been identified, we look for evidence that public policy choices may have promoted and enhanced a metro area’s ability to succeed and to regain control of its own economic destiny. Methodologically, we construct a regression model which identifies the small metro areas that achieved higher-than-expected economic prosperity (winners) and the areas that saw lower-than-expected economic prosperity (losers) according to the model. Next, we explore whether indications exist that winners and losers are qualitatively different from other areas in ways that may indicate consequences of policy choices. A cluster analysis is completed to group the metro areas based on changes in a host of social, economic, and demographic variables between 1990 and 2000. We then use contingency table analysis and ANOVA to see if “winning” or “losing,” as measured by the error term from the regression, is related to the grouping of metro areas in a way that may indicate the presence of deliberate and replicable government policy. 

Making Public Participation Legal

Working Group on Legal Frameworks for Public Participation

Making the Case for Linking Community Development and Health

Edmonds et al

This report, published in partnership by the Center on Social Disparities in Health, the Build Healthy Places Network, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is a "resource for those working to improve low-income communities and the lives of the people living in them." Despite growing recognition that social and economic conditions are the primary drivers of health, the fields of community development and public health remain siloed. This new report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Build Healthy Places Network outlines specific opportunities to integrate the two fields and overcome barriers to collaboration. It also includes recommendations on how to measure the impact of cross-sector collaborations and refine programs accordingly.  

Regenerating America's Legacy Cities

Alan Mallach and Lavea Brachman

This Lincoln Institute of Land Policy study, entitled Regenerating America’s Legacy Cities, examines new strategies for rebuilding and reinventing the economies of older industrial cities that have experienced dramatic job and population decreases over the last few decades. Authors Alan Mallach and Lavea Brachman detail how these “legacy cities” can employ land-use planning tools that reflect the changing economy and social fabric to support new forms of economic development.

State of the Dream 2013: A Long Way From Home: Housing Asset Policy and the Racial Wealth Divide

Tim Sullivan, Maz Ali, Carlos Perez de Alejo, Brian Miller and Nicole Marin Baena

To mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, United for a Fair Economy outlines how a national history of racially discriminatory policies and practices created the racial wealth divide that exists today. Worse, present policy perpetuates these patterns. This report offers recommendations for housing, ownership, and wealth creation policies that aim to reduce this divide by designing asset building policies that reach those most in need and not just home-buyers and encouraging alternative ownership models that build community, and not just individual, wealth.  Included are several case studies that highlight action at the local, state, and regional levels to address racial inequality. 

Keeping Wealth Local: Shared Ownership and Wealth Control For Rural Communities

Marjorie Kelly and Shanna Ratner

Resources do not represent community wealth unless communities own and control them. This handbook looks at various kinds of shared ownership, including cooperatives, employee ownership, community land trusts, municipal ownership, local and tribal ownership, mission-controlled ownership, and community covenants and easements. Each section looks at strengths, weaknesses, the range of applications, expertise required, and sources of assistance.

Why Some Rural Communities Prosper While Others Do Not

Andrew M. Isserman, Edward Feser and Drake Warren
report prepared for the Office of the Under Secretary for Rural Development, U.S. Department of Agriculture, under Cooperative Agreement AG RBCSRBS-02-12

Regionalism: Growing Together To Expand Opportunity To All

Glenn Johnson, Angel Torres, Samir Gambhir, Mary McGirl, Julie Nielsen, Jason Reece, Rebecca Reno, Denis Rhoden Jr., Christy Rogers, Angela Stanley and Arnold Chandler
Submitted to the Presidents’ Council of Cleveland

The Commons Rising

David Bollier, Jonathan Rowe and edited by Peter Barnes and Seth Zuckerman

When you hear the phrase “the commons,” you might think of a medieval town where peasants graze sheep, but the commons of the 21st century is much more hi-tech. From wi-fi to broadcast spectrum to the Internet, a new commons is rising.

Enterprising Organizations: New Asset-Based and Other Innovative Approaches to Solving Social and Economic Problems: Highlights from a forum on Social Enterprise

Alan Abramson, editor

In May 2005, The Aspen Institute, in collaboration with the Democracy Collaborative, convened practitioners, investors, foundation donors, elected officials, scholars, and reporters to generate ideas on how to advance community wealth building efforts. This report provides highlights from the discussion that ensued.